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Dilmah Conservation Launches 8 Landmark Publications on Sri Lanka's Natural and Cultural Heritage

January 27, 2014
  • Dilmah Conservation Launches 8 Landmark Publications on Sri Lanka's Natural and Cultural Heritage
  • Dilmah Conservation Launches 8 Landmark Publications on Sri Lanka's Natural and Cultural Heritage
This not for profit initiative by Dilmah Conservation seeks to offer current and comprehensive research in the form of readily accessible visual guides. The eight publications released include: Jaiva Vividhathwaye Sri Lankeeya Urumaya (Our Biological Heritage)- authored by a panel of scientists and compiled by Professor Hiran Amasekara, Professor Devaka Weerakoon and Dr Siril Wijesundara, Sri Lanka's Forests: Nature at Your Service- by a collection of 10 scientist and edited by Asoka De Silva, A Pictorial Guide to Udawalawe National Park- edited by Professor Sarath Kotagama, Traditional Communities in Sri Lanka: The Ahikuntaka - by Nuwan Gankanda, Indigenous Communities in Sri Lanka: The Veddahs- by Nuwan Gankanda, An introduction to Common Spiders of Sri Lanka- authored by Ranil. P. Nanayakkara, Recognising Deadly Venomous Snakes from Harmless Snakes of Sri Lanka- authored by L.J. Mendis Wickramasinghe and a Field guide on Pest Management Strategies as Alternatives to Methyl Bromide in Sri Lanka- by Dr. H.M.R.K. Ekanayake and Professor W.L. Sumathipala.

Jaiva Vividhathwaye Sri Lankeeya Urumaya (Our Biological Heritage) provides a picturesque overview of Sri Lanka's wealth of biodiversity towards providing students with sound preliminary understanding of Sri Lanka's flora and fauna. Similarly, A Pictorial Guide to Udawalawe National Park documents the vibrant plant and animal life found in the Udawalawe National Park, which is also home to the Elephant Transit Home supported by Dilmah Conservation. This illustrated guide will no doubt serve as a valuable resource for park visitors and nature enthusiasts alike and help them learn more about the unique habitats and ecosystem found in this sanctuary. The publication of Sri Lanka's Forests: Nature at Your Service compiled by the Sri Lanka Association for the Advancement of Science (SLAAS) was supported by Dilmah Conservation, towards documenting Sri Lanka's invaluable forest resources and highlighting their ecological and cultural significance to the Island.

An introduction to Common Spiders of Sri Lanka and Recognising Deadly Venomous Snakes from Harmless Snakes of Sri Lanka mark the first of Dilmah Conservation's initiative to compile simple visual field guides towards not only making available current zoological research, but encouraging wider learning about overlooked or feared animals. This series of field guides is aimed at raising awareness and improving understanding among the general public, dispelling irrational fears and misconceptions and highlighting the important role played by creatures such as snakes and spiders in maintaining the balance of ecosystems.

Dilmah Conservation supported the publication of Field guide on Pest Management Strategies as Alternatives to Methyl Bromide in Sri Lanka in order to endorse Sri Lanka's pledge to phase out the use of Methyl Bromide as a signatory state to the 'Montreal Protocol on Substances that deplete the Ozone Layer'. As a lack of easily-understood resource material was identified, Dilmah Conservation supported the compilation of this field guide for those engaged in pest control and commodity management including the general public with an interest in producing pesticide-free produce.

Furthermore, in line with its commitment to empowering marginalised communities and helping them preserve their cultural heritage, Dilmah Conservation engaged in numerous initiatives towards documenting the disappearing customs and traditional livelihoods of the indigenous Veddah community and the nomadic Ahikuntika community. Indigenous Communities in Sri Lanka: the Veddahs and Traditional Communities in Sri Lanka: The Ahikuntaka are a culmination of these efforts, chronicling the oral histories, heritage, lives and occupations of members of these communities.  The Veddahs publication in particular delves into the rites and rituals of the Coastal Veddah community scattered in Sri Lanka's East; a group that has been largely overlooked and excluded as a consequence of the war.

Dilmah Conservation hopes that these publications will not only contribute to the conservation of Sri Lanka's natural and cultural heritage, but inspire further learning and research.

For more information on -Who Cares about Nature' and the work we do visit http://www.dilmahconservation.org/