News

Creating awareness and sharing knowledge

December 31, 2013
  • Creating awareness and sharing knowledge
  • Creating awareness and sharing knowledge

Dilmah Conservation will be launching a series of publications on Sri Lanka’s abundant biodiversity and heritage, with the aim of creating awareness, sharing knowledge and making available information on our country’s flora, fauna and the indigenous and nomad communities to the general public. These unique volumes will be launches at ‘Who Cares about Nature’, an event that will explore the role of business in serving community and environment and man in the natural ecosystem.

This non-profit initiative by Dilmah strives to offer contemporary data, imagery and a global perspective on the fragile biodiversity and noteworthy heritage of Sri Lanka in order to educate and encourage the public to conserve nature and empower the minority communities of the island.

The eight publications to be released include Jaiva Vividhathwaye Sri Lankeeya Urumaya (Our Biological Heritage) – authored by a panel of scientists and compiled Professor Hiran Amasekara, Professor Devaka Weerakoon and Dr, Siril Wijesundara, Sri Lanka’s Forests: Nature at Your Service – by a collection of 10 scientist and edited by Asoka De Silva, A Pictorial Guide to Udawalawe National Park – edited by Professor Sarath Kotagama, Traditional Communities in Sri Lank: The Ahikuntaka- by Nuwan Gankanda, Indigenous Communities in Sri Lanka: The Veddahs – by Nuwan Gankanda, An introduction to Common Spiders of Sri Lanka – authored by Ranil. P. Nanayakkara, Recognising Deadly Venomous Snakes from Harmless Snakes of Sri Lanka – authored by L.J. Mendis Wickramasinghe and a Field guide on Pest Management Strategies as Alternatives to Methyl Bromide in Sri Lanka – by Dr. H.M.R.K. Ekanayake and Professor W.L. Sumathipala.

Jaiva Vividhathwaye Sri Lankeeya Urumaya (Our Biological Heritage) brings to life diverse biological landscape of Sri Lanka and its abundant beauty and uniqueness. Dilmah Conservation sponsors the publication of Sri Lanka’s Forests: Nature at Your Service due to its significant contribution to identifying, raining awareness and understanding of the value of Sri Lanka’s array of forests. As the title suggests, A Pictorial Guide to Udawalawe National Park depicts this vast elephant sanctuary through vivid imagery, informative illustrations and colourful representations of its flora and fauna.

The publication, Indigenous Communities in Sri Lanka: The Veddahs chronicles in detail the lives of the coastal Veddahs of the country. For years given very little recognition, the coastal Veddahs had integrated overtime with the mainstream communities in the East and was leading obscure lives with little recognition of their true identities. “The publication and the studies are thus very timely,” says Professor Sarath Kotagama, former Director of Wildlife Conservation and presently the Professor of Environmental Science, Bird Ecology and Behaviour, Conservation Biology and Ecotourism at the University of Colombo in his Foreword to the publication. Traditional Communities in Sri Lanka: The Ahikuntaka documents the lives and livelihood methods of the Ahikuntaka, their caste system, religious beliefs, court system and traditional medication methods. The publication is based on the scientific studies of Professor Ranjith Bandara also includes several case studies following the community’s way of life.

An introduction to Common Spiders of Sri Lanka could be identified as the first general guide to the spiders of Sri Lanka and offers scientific and factual information in a simple and easy-to-read manner in order to help readers overcome the general fear and animosity towards these gentle creatures whose existence is of vital use to humans. Another attempt at battling a local animal phobia, Recognising Deadly Venomous Snakes from Harmless Snakes of Sri Lanka attempts to portray snakes in their role as a vital part of our ecosystem while trying to dismiss the misconception of these creatures as being deadly and dangerous. Due to our widespread fear and loathing, many harmless snake species are inadvertently killed by humans. This publication strives to change this attitude in its readership.

A unique addition to this collection of volumes is the Field guide on Pest Management Strategies as Alternatives to Methyl Bromide in Sri Lanka. The book highlights the perilous consequences of utilizing Methyl Bromide as a pesticide and discusses environmentally safe alternatives in pest management in Sri Lanka.